• Events

    New Book: Spaces of War, War of Spaces

    Published July 23rd 2020 by Bloomsbury Editor(s): Sarah Maltby, Ben O’Loughlin, Katy Parry, Laura Roselle Cover image: Aluminium Waste Pond at Petkovici from the Bleed series 2005. © Simon-Norfolk Spaces of War, War of Spaces provides a rich, international and multi-disciplinary engagement with the convergence of war and media through the conceptual lens of ‘space’ Visit the book website Click here to purchase. Use 35% online discount code: GLRTW5 Overview ‘Space’ offers a profound, challenging and original framework through which notions of communication, embodiment, enactment, memory and power are interrogated not only in terms of how media spaces (traditional, digital, cultural, aesthetic, embodied, mnemonic) transform the conduct, outcomes and consequences of war for all involved,…

  • Events

    Enemy Encounters: Online Conference

    19th-20th July 2021 Hosted by the IWM Institute for the Public Understanding of War and Conflict and the Cardiff University AHRC funded project ‘Strange Meetings: Enemy Encounters 1800-2020’, this event seeks to explore views of enmity and allegiance in modern warfare. The conference focuses on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries but we also welcome pro-posals relating to the nineteenth century which look forward to that era. We are interested in a broad, interdisciplinary range of approaches to experiences and representations of the enemy, with a particular focus on how the ‘other’ side is presented in museums, in first person writings, journalism, literature, art, performance, film and photography.  While the 1914…

  • Events

    Tim Hetherington collection and conflict imagery network

    **Image: Czech policeman, Matren Ondraçka, trains new Liberian National Police (LNP) recruits in riot control as part of the United Nations Civilian Police (CIVPOL) restructuring plan. Monrovia. Liberia. May 2004. © IWM (DC 64131 The first event for the AHRC-funded ‘Tim Hetherington collection and conflict imagery network’ take places on: Date: 22 April 2021Time: 3-5pm (UK time (BST))Price: FreeLocation: Teams/Zoom (link will be sent to those who register via Eventbrite) Eventbrite link The Tim Hetherington collection is based at the Imperial War Museum, and this AHRC-funded research network aims to explore Hetherington’s approach to recording conflict and to examine his legacy in the broader historical context of conflict imagery. For our first…

  • Events

    War and Culture Studies – What Next?

    An online workshop for early career researchers   Friday 18th June 2021  The Journal for War and Culture Studies has been at the forefront of the cultural turn in war studies from its first issue in 2008. Since then it has expanded beyond its original base in Modern Languages and twentieth-century European Studies to become truly global and to encompass research from the late eighteenth century to the present day from both the Arts and Humanities and the Social Sciences.   Throughout this time it has taken great pride in being a forum in which both established and new voices are heard. To continue this work, it will be hosting an online workshop to discuss…

  • Events

    Visualising War Workshops

    To find out more about the Visualising War Project click here. Principal Investigators: Alice König & Nicolas Wiater. Contact: viswar@st-andrews.ac.uk Details of the project workshops, and how to register, are listed below 15th March, 2021 (online) This workshop will bring members of the Visualising War research group together to share work in progress and discuss current and future interdisciplinary opportunities. It will proceed in three parts: 2-3.30: Staging War Stories The Visualising War project has been working with professional theatre company NMT Automatics since 2019, contributing to their development of ‘Tempus Fugit: Troy and Us’. This play brings an ancient Greek war story into dialogue with 21st century experiences of war and will be performed at…

  • Publications

    New Book: Syria in Perspective

    By Dr Pablo Sapag Visit the website The book considers the propagandistic and military dimensions of the crisis, suggesting how Syria might evolve. At the heart of this analysis is a key element of Syrian society: its ingrained interconfessional character deriving from the historical presence on its soil of various religious faiths. Powerful minorities have, however, repeatedly applied political and military pressure to force the state to abandon its non-religious and non-discriminatory character. The author’s review of scholarly texts is combined with research in Syria and other countries. He has conducted interviews with religious leaders, NGO personnel, combatants, displaced people and other victims. Among those interviewed is the Syrian President,…